Sharing the Health

Good Times!

people enjoying a sports game outside

Jeri Mondloch (right) with friend, Annie Bale, enjoys rooting for her University of Minnesota Gophers. She dressed up for Halloween as a Conehead! Jeri uses trans-tracheal oxygen.

I have a hint for users of BiPaP devices. I use a wig cap to keep the Velcro on the straps from snagging in my hair. I also heard about a valve that is placed between the can- nula and the concentrator tubing  that  allows you to adjust the flow without having to do it at the concentrator. It is from www.softhose.com and costs $10 plus shipping and handling. They also have very soft cannulas and tubing you may order by calling 1-858-748-5677.

RVD, Colorado

 One of our biggest changes in recent years came with the change to HFA metered dose inhalers. Since old habits are hard to break and you may still be wondering about the differences, you can download information and a chart on the inhalers, number of doses in the inhaler and how to clean and prime it from National Jewish Health at http://tinyurl.com/64jsvdr.

For those without access to the Internet, send a request with a self-address, stamped envelope to The Pulmonary Paper, PO Box 877, Ormond Beach, FL 2175 and we would be happy to send you a copy.

Today’s Internet users have a host of acronyms that they use in conversations that might seem like a foreign language, as LOL is Laughing Out Loud.

Gail Keller of Westfield, NJ, sent us this list, developed especially for seniors, some of which you might want to use in your next email!

ATD: At the Doctor’s

BFF: Best Friend Farted

BTW: Bring The Wheelchair

BYOT: Bring Your Own Teeth

CBM: Covered By Medicare DWI: Driving While Incontinent

FWBB: Friend With Beta Blockers FWIW: Forgot Where I Was

FYI: Found Your Insulin

GGLKI: Gotta Go, Laxative Kicking In GHA: Got Heartburn Again

HGBM: Had Good Bowel Movement IMHO: Is My Hearing-Aid On?

LMDO: Laughing My Dentures Out LOL: Living On Lipitor

OMG: Oh, My Grandchildren!

ROFLCGU: Rolling On The Floor Laughing And Can’t Get Up

SGGP: Sorry, Gotta Go Poop

TGIF: Thank Goodness It’s Four O’Clock (for early bird specials)

TTYL: Talk To You Louder

WAITT: Who Am I Talking To?

WTP: Where’re The Prunes?

I have excessive mucus. First thing in the morning, I drink 1-1/2 to 2 tablespoons of lemon juice, sweetened with honey in a glass of hot water. This clears my throat and is also a natural laxative. Another plus is that it tastes good! I think people with diabetes should check with a health professional about using this.

Janet McLees, Flint, MI

woman at a restaurant

Julia enjoys having lunch with friends.

 

Julia Steitz of Penfield, NY, ordered a lung flute from Medical Acoustics (http://medicalacoustics.com), a new product to help clear secretions. Because of her low flow rates when breathing through the device, she was unable to get it to work properly. Her husband tried and with normal lung values had no problems. The company gave her a complete refund and told her they were working on improving the product.

She also wants to share a tip for doing laundry. Julia sits on a chair and uses a “grabber” to get the clothes out of the washer and dryer.

The American Association for Respiratory Care has published an informative 56-page booklet entitled A Patient’s Guide to Aerosol Drug Delivery. The publication covers each type of medication device with instructions on how to clean them and solve problems that may arise.

You may see it on the Internet at www.yourlung health.org/healthy_living/aerosol/

people on a float on the water

Martin Lannon of Prior Lake, MN, a liquid oxygen user, enjoys being pulled in the water on an appropriately named tube!

Jenna from Florida found she had problems with her Spiriva capsules when she stored her medication in the bathroom. The humidity may have been causing the medication to stick together and the capsule did not seem as easy to break. Once she moved her medicines to a different room the problem solved itself.

If your oximeter mistakenly gets wet, take the batteries out immediately and cover the oximeter in a small con- tainer with rice. Cover the container and leave it overnight. The rice will absorb the water and your oxime- ter will be fine with new batteries! Maggie B., Illinois